Mornings At BHS Are A Drag

by Killian Yu
Class of 2015

Homeroom.

A pointless, inutile period of everyone’s school day that has been introduced to most in their middle school years. Most will find that homeroom seems to drag on for hours; as kids are forced to stay in a room, doing absolutely nothing for twenty minutes. The blank stares at the wall as morning announcements are arbitrarily announced, when really, no one is listening.

However, for the teachers and administrators homeroom does prove to have at least some value. Homeroom does make attendance much easier, and it provides a sense of organization to start the school day, it gives a sense of a beginning, a starting ground. Which for some is “essential” to a functional, well-oiled school day. Those are all quite reasonable reasons to keep homeroom in everyone’s schedule. However, the real problem I have for homeroom is the strict, and absolutely unnecessary rules that come with homeroom and the morning routine.

For one, kids are expected to be in homeroom at such a specific time. Five minute warning. Start the walk back to homeroom. Two minute warning. One minute warning and Ms. Moynihan screaming in the hallways. Now it’s really time to get your butt into homeroom! And for what? Only for the student to sit aimlessly for another 10 minutes. What is the point in this rush? Attendance for the homeroom teacher takes no more than 30 seconds, a quick scan of the room and voila, their job is done for the morning. Surely, the pressure to get to homeroom in such a timely fashion is a bit unnecessary and quite frankly, just a bit tyrannical. To me, it seems like bored administrators trying to assert power and feel needed at a rather uneventful period of the day (Take out this sentence if content questionable).

Another part of the morning routine that really grinds my gears is the check in routine. I have no problem with signing in if a student is late to school, it is obviously an extremely organized, and effective way to keep track of students that come in late. However, one of the most ludicrous rules that Braintree High School implements is to keep students waiting at the main foyer if the morning announcements have begun. This practice is straight up a waste of time, with no bearing or logic behind its execution. It makes absolutely no sense to keep students behind just because morning announcements are on. Even if students come in late during announcements, they can still easily have time to go to their lockers, and make it to homeroom on time. Or in the very least, get to their lockers and get to class on time. But no, instead, we must wait.

I have found myself several times caught in the dreadful period of morning announcements and found myself aimlessly wasting time, that could be spent organizing my books at my locker, just standing there listening to the teachers ramble on. Because of this, every single time, I have been late to my first class by minutes, not seconds, but minutes! This is ludicrous. At school, the administrators, by implementing this practice have essentially put morning announcements above class! I’m sorry, but the last time I checked, class was more important. And as an AP student, I speak for everyone, that that minute or two or three minutes that you miss on a test, in-class essay or even note taking is crucial. That is time that one simply does not get back. But sorry, apparently, we can’t go to our lockers and get ready for the day and listen to the morning announcements at the same time. And for that reason we must absolutely compromise our academic pursuits. There is just no other plausible solution to this absolutely necessary practice!

All I question is why we are so anal about such little and non-critical aspects of the morning routine? The strictness that comes with the morning routine seriously does elude me. Why keep kids waiting? Why keep them on such a strict clock, as if we were robots and not humans?

Killian Yu is a student in Advanced Placement English Language and Composition